What Would Coco Do?

"How many cares one loses when one decides not to be something but to be someone." Coco Chanel

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Location: Nashville, Tennessee, United States

I love the finer things in life, and I love writing. That's why I'm here. Want Coco to review your product? E-mail me at cococares@gmail.com!

Monday, October 09, 2006

The Promise of a New Week

The sky is sunny this Monday morn.

I saw a squirrel, it was merry.

The drive to work was easy thanks to the Columbus Day holiday. Tonight everyone will hit the bars sporting 15th Century clothing, and drinks copious amounts of liquor out of novelty NiƱa, Pinta, and Santa Maria ship mugs.

I scored a great parking space.

But my happy spirit was dashed when I saw a lady of fine figure and face in a fashion tragedy.

The young lady got on the parking garage elevator right after me, so I was able to inspect her outfit with great detail. She was wearing a tight sweater, exposing her midriff, a casual (too casual belt), and a pair of tweed pants that should have been lovely.

I say should, because even though there was a cuff created by the garment manufacturer, said pants were still too long, so she just rolled them up one more time.

Wrong, wrong, wrong!

She got of the elevator in front of me, so I watched her walk for half a block before we parted ways. One cuff came undone in that short distance, and was dragging on the concrete. Lame to the max.

Here are the lessons we need to take away from this sorry person.

1. If the garment does not fit in any way, take it to an alterations place. Comfort is essential, and if you constantly have to adjust yourself or your clothing because the garment is ill fitting it is not worth it.

2. Exposing your midriff is unacceptable in a work environment unless you work in a strip club, or work at Hooters. She would have looked much better with a lovely sweater twin-set.

3. Don't leave the price tag on the bottom of your shoe. This girl did, and that was the first thing my eye went to. I don't even remember if her shoes were cute.

This girl obviously suffered from Lazy Dresser Syndrome. She could not even take an iron to the newly formed cuff that she made. If she did, it would have had more of a chance of staying in place, but not much. It would have taken a minute, maybe less, to take that price tag off of her shoe.

Don't be a lazy dresser people. Details count!

1 Comments:

Anonymous Kate O' said...

Good reminder as we head into fall weather. It's always a fun season for fashion, because of layers! Layers are fun, but it's almost like the opportunity to mess up is compounded because, well, more clothes.

Your mention of the price tag on the bottom of the shoe reminded me: I was returning to my office after lunch one day a week or so ago, and saw a woman fall as she came down the steps in front of the building. It was a bad fall, and took several of us witnesses to tend to her. But after a few minutes of doing all I was qualified to do, I stood back and noticed the poor woman had the price tag sticker on the bottom of her shoe. Amidst everything else she had going wrong for her at that moment, I'm sure she couldn't have cared less, but it prompted a flash of pity from me -- it made the scene all the more pathetic. Later though, I found out that the woman had been at the office building for a job interview. Now granted, job interviews don't typically involve lying prone in a position where passersby can easily see the bottom of your shoe, but you just never know, do you? It's not so much the possibility that you could fall and people could see the bottom of your shoe; it's that it's a detail, and potential employers tend to care very much about details.

I tell that story not, of course, to ridicule the woman who obviously had a very bad day, but as an absurd illustration of how you just never know when it will matter how much attention you pay to details.

10:16 AM  

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